Business Attorney,lawyer
Written by Edward Lai

Recordkeeping and Federal Overtime Rules Change

Under a new ruling, which will be effective on December 1, a salaried worker must now make at least $933 per week to be exempt from overtime pay. This amount is a considerable hike from the current minimum of $455 per week.

Employers are now expected to keep up with the new ruling and to coordinate their systems according by the time the new ruling takes effect. Employers should take into account that a system upgrade may be needed to accommodate the increase of non-exempt employees.

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Business Attorney, Corporate
Written by Edward Lai

Corporate Bosses Take Blame for Employee Criminality

It might sound absurd to some, but a new bill currently being reviewed could allow corporate bosses to take the blame for the criminality of their employees. However there is an argument that this might sound unfair to some and others could argue that the boss may not be fully aware of their employees’ undertakings.

But before anyone cries foul let’s take a look at why the idea that the boss also take blame for employee criminality could actually be good. Normally when an employee commits a criminal act while employed by the company that person would usually take the blame. In fact, it would be very rare that a high level executive who is in charge of said employee would take the blame.

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Attorney,Employment Law
Written by Edward Lai

A Look into Wrongful Termination

Every day, people are fired from their jobs for different reasons. However upon closer evaluation, how many people were actually fired properly? Have you actually looked into the definition of  proper termination and wrongful termination? If you believe that you have been wrongfully terminated, you can file a Wrongful Termination Lawsuit against your former employer.

So what does wrongful termination actually mean? Legally wrongful termination is described as the situation where the employee’s contract was terminated by the employer, but the grounds for the termination breaches one or more terms of the terms of contract of employment, or  a statute of employment law.

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