Business Attorney,Lawyer
Written by Edward Lai

What to Look Out for to Start a Business in 2017

Starting a new business is never an easy task; there are constant changes in the corporate world that a potential business owner has to look out for. There are numerous laws and regulations for owning and operating a business on not only the federal, state and county level, but in some states at the city level as well.

So what are some of the potential changes that business owners have to look out for in 2017? Let’s take a quick look at the some of the important points:

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Business Attorney,Construction
Written by Edward Lai

What Job Searchers Should Look Forward to in 2017

The U.S economy is looking stronger as a new report shows that the unemployment rate has dropped below five percent. With this being said, those seeking jobs will have a lot to look out for when job hunting during the next year. If those looking for a job are left unprepared they could find themselves jobless for longer than expected.

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Construction Defect Family Law
Written by Edward Lai

Mediator Tells States to End the Water Wars

The month-long trail which was to end the high stakes water war between the states of Georgia and Florida ended with a special master telling the two neighboring states to negotiate a settlement.

Special Master Ralph Lancaster reminded both states that there is still a lot to lose, be it for the blooming metropolis of Atlanta or the residents of the small town of Apalachicola, Florida. According to Lancaster the two sides should “settle the blasted thing,” and that either way one side is going to be unhappy with the results. Lancaster even hinted that both sides may not like the outcome of the court mandated mediation.

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Construction Defect Family Law
Written by Edward Lai

Handling Family Business Disputes

Any lawyer who has handled family business disputes can say that these cases tend to get ugly, protracted and destructive. This is normally caused by the family members in power not wanting to relinquish that power over time or at all. However, a good litigator will be able to handle these disputes as long as they are well prepared and willing to go to the extra mile.

But why are family business disputes so important? For most a family business would mean a small mom and pop store that has been in the family for many years. However, it should be noted that several large businesses have been family run and owned for many years. Many businesses even employ hundreds of thousands of employees.

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Lawyer,Business Attorney
Written by Edward Lai

How to Save Your Small Business’ Online Reputation

Online reviews now a days are a dime a dozen, and for many established businesses these reviews mean little to them. However for a new small business owner a power review could mean the difference between closing down or initial success.

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Business Attorney, Corporate
Written by Edward Lai

Corporate Bosses Take Blame for Employee Criminality

It might sound absurd to some, but a new bill currently being reviewed could allow corporate bosses to take the blame for the criminality of their employees. However there is an argument that this might sound unfair to some and others could argue that the boss may not be fully aware of their employees’ undertakings.

But before anyone cries foul let’s take a look at why the idea that the boss also take blame for employee criminality could actually be good. Normally when an employee commits a criminal act while employed by the company that person would usually take the blame. In fact, it would be very rare that a high level executive who is in charge of said employee would take the blame.

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Business Attorney, Corporate Business,
Written by Edward Lai

Comparing LLCs, LLPs, S Corps, and C Corps

Businesses can be comprised of only one person or they can be at the other end of the spectrum — multinational companies with thousands of employees, and their needs will vary as far as business structure. The chief considerations in incorporation revolve around taxation and liability. The primary differences among limited liability companies (LLCs), limited liability partnerships (LLPs), S corporations (S corps) and C corporations (C corps) involve the determination of how much is payable to the Internal Revenue Service when profits are taxed and who is responsible for paying these taxes.

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Lawyer,Corporate Business
Written by Edward Lai

Articles of Incorporation and Operating Agreement Comparison

Certain types of corporate structures are required to draft legal documents that provide information about the company, such as its purpose and how it will operate. For a corporation, this legal document is the articles of incorporation. For a limited liability company (LLC), it is an operating agreement. These two documents have similarities and differences as to how each is utilized by its respective business structure.

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Lawyer, Litigation ,Business Attorney
Written by Edward Lai

Signs of Corporate Bribery

In the world of business money is exchanged, gifts are given, and favors are done every day. However, when does that money exchange, gift given, or favor done become a bribe?

To determine this, let’s first take a look at what the State of California defines a bribe to be. According to the law, a bribe defines anything of value or advantage, present or prospective, or any promise or undertaking to give any, asked, given, or accepted, with a corrupt intent to influence, unlawfully, the person to whom it is given, in his or action, vote, or opinion, in any public or official capacity.

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Lawyer Litigation, Lawyer
Written by Edward Lai

Small Businesses Get Protection from Disability Access Litigation

The State of California has passed a law in hopes to help small businesses who have lawsuits filed against them under the American’s with Disabilities Act (ADA).  Under the ADA, persons who have a disability can sue a small business if they encounter a barrier that causes them to suffer injury, discomfort or embarrassment.

After the passing of the ADA, the number of these lawsuits has risen considerably.  Recently, the lawmakers of California saw it fit to try to slow down ADA litigation, while at the same time, making sure that the new laws do not measurably block access for the disabled. The numbers show that while California has about 12% of the disabled people in the country, the state is responsible for over 40% of the nation’s ADA lawsuits.

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